Ribbon snake for adoption

Snake for adoption


Finding a snake to adopt easy. You’ll find them available for the following reasons:

  • It got too large
  • Kids lost interest in it
  • It has become aggressive
  • Lack of time
  • Lack of money
  • Owner health issues
Finding snakes to adopt The first place I go if I’m looking to adopt a snake is “Community pets” section. If you use the search feature and type in snakes, pythons, boas or something along those lines you will almost always turn up something.

Then I contact the local . Most people go there to, or cat they also get snakes in from time to time.

Finally a good place to find a snake is a website called where rescues will often list what they have available. You can search by species, location, age, size, and gender.

One thing you’ll probably find in common with all of these place and anywhere else you might look for a snake to adopt is that you’ll see lots of Ball Pythons, Corn Snakes, and Boas that need new homes. There are of course other snakes to be found, but those are the most common that are in need of adoption.

Questions to ask when you adopt a snake Having adopted my share of snakes (and other animals) I’ve come to realize it is important to know what you are getting before you agree to take the animal. That’s why it is important to go with a list of questions ready. I like to ask the following: How long have you had the snake? That might not seem important, but someone who claims to have had their animal for any amount of time should be able to give you a lot of information. If they say they’ve only had it for a few days or weeks you’re not going to get very much useful knowledge from them. If on the other hand they’ve had the snake for several years asking some questions could prove worth your while. Where did you get the snake? It’s good to know where the snake came from prior to reaching the most recent owner who you are doing business with. If it came from a breeder you can contact them and maybe establish a relationship. If it came from a pet store at least you’ll know. It’s also quite possible the snake was adopted by this person the same as you are considering doing. How old is the snake? This will help you to gauge how long of a commitment you might be making to the snake. If the snake is only two or three years old you’re looking at twenty plus years, but if it’s 20 or 25 years old the snake is getting along in age. All snakes have various life expectancies so you’ll need to be familiar with the species you are considering. What is the snake eating and when? It’s always best, at least initially, to keep a snake on the same feeding schedule and diet as it is currently on. Being moved to a new place is very stressful to a snake and the less chaos you cause it the better off things will be. What vet do you take the snake to? I’ve only ever once had someone give me an answer to this question. Most people don’t take their snakes to the vet. If possible I like to know who it is so I can find out any health concerns from the vet BEFORE I take it to my vet. Why are you getting rid of the snake? This is perhaps the most important question. The purpose isn’t to pry into someone’s private affairs but to figure out if there is anything that you should be aware of concerning the snake. Maybe it is just too big, or it could be a biter, maybe it has a chronic illness. Whatever the reason it will only make your life easier if you know the answer.

There are many more questions you could ask so the best thing to do is draw up a list of questions you think are important so they are ready when it comes time to start asking them.

Before you pick the snake up Just like when you buy a new snake from a breeder there are some things you need to have in order before you get it.
  • Housing should be setup and ready to go
  • Have food on hand or a local source of food
  • Care sheets for the snake you are getting if you aren’t familiar with them
  • Online resources to help you as needed
  • A vet you can contact “just in case”

Once you’ve found the snake you want to adopt, made the necessary arrangements, and put everything in order then and only then is it time to get the snake. Go pick it up (or whatever arrangements you’ve made) and give it a good home.

Source: pet-snakes.com

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